TSA (Temporal Security Agency)

Gamer, sorta-programmer, soon to be finishing college.
Who I Follow

kingsgrave:

deducecanoe:

congragulation:

“sherlock 1800s au”

[narrows eyes]

There’s a fantastic fic writer who’s quite prolific in this area. Sixty stories already! I don’t know if they’re doing any more. Their username is ‘Arthur_Conan_Doyle’ but you have to google their…

troam:

these series seem to have a reoccurring theme

(couldn’t resist adding the twins)

(via thenixkat)

prokopetz:

kurtwagnernightcrawler:

civil-anarchy:

lordgrunty:

whitebeltwriter:

artemis-devotee:

carry-on-my-wayward-butt:

""but that book character has blue/grey/light eyes so obviously they’re white!!"" ://///

Yes, goddamnit

















(Reminder that light eyes and blonde hair can be caused by conditions, such as Waardenburg Syndrome and albinism, but they are still real people that can (and should) be represented in media and such)

And also I can add that I have news for y’all, people can be black and naturally blonde







And literally people from ANY KIND can be a redheadand have freackles and such


















So please, stop pretending only white people can have those characteristics, jfc, it’s sofucking annoying.

boom-de-yada

Boom de yada

Just to add on - While race is a very, very, very significant issue, race as we know it is a social construct. When you acknowledge that all people on earth have veeeery little genetic variation in the scope of things, it’s much easier to break oneself from the training of “only white people have this, only black people have that, only asian people have this trait, etc”

the funny thing ist though, even if a character is described as having dark skin, dark hair and brown eyes, theyre still being cast as white

It’s also worth noting that the fact that a black person has blonde or red hair doesn’t necessarily mean they’ve got a white ancestor kicking around in their family tree. Recent genetic studies suggest that the gene that codes for blonde hair in black African populations is completely different from the gene that codes for blonde hair in white European populations, and that blond hair among Aboriginal Australian populations is connected to yet a third gene. The same trait has independently arisen at least three times in humanity’s generic history, and only one of those cases is linked with light skin per se.

(Interestingly, this also means that the widspread belief that blonde hair is part of a complex of adaptations to low-sunlight regions is probably false, since populations that live in the sunniest parts of the world have their own blonde-hair mutations unrelated to the European one.)

(via thenixkat)

…the older I get, the more I see how women are described as having gone mad, when what they’ve actually become is knowledgeable and powerful and fucking furious.
Fetishizing ‘power’ in women characters – having them kicking ass and always being ready with a putdown - isn’t the same as writing them as human beings.

Jack Graham, in Stephen Moffat - A Case For The Prosecution, a guest post on Philip Sandifer’s blog (via linnealurks)

This is applies double if your reasons for making a female character “powerful” are so that she can wear less, thus hopefully generate bigger profits and showcase true originality.

- wincenworks

(via bikiniarmorbattledamage)

(via thenixkat)

howtoskinatiger:

caringblog:

Stop Skinning Animals Alive in China
Animals on fur farms in China are bludgeoned, slammed on the pavement and have their heads kicked in. Often, this doesn’t kill the poor animal so it remains alive for the skinning process. These living animals then have their skin ripped from their flesh while they hang by their limbs writhing in pain. Once the fur has been detached, the bodies are then thrown into piles where many animals continue to breath and squirm for up to ten minutes after being skinned alive. This brutal and torturous fur farming industry in China must be stopped.

Thankfully skinning alive is actually a myth created by animal rights groups. Those so-called undercover videos were actually staged and the people in them were paid by the group filming to skin animals alive, with the filmmakers testifying in court in 2009 that they paid for these acts to take place.
Skinning alive for fur doesn’t happen anywhere, not even China where the welfare of fur animals is poor at best. As someone who has skinned dead animals I can assure you it is not easy to do without damaging the pelt. Skinning an animal alive would guarantee that you will destroy the pelt through creating rips, tears and bloodstains, making the pelt worthless. Where is the logic in destroying your own product and putting yourself out of business? Skinning alive would also put the skinner at serious risk of injury. In short, there is no logical, ethical or financial reason to ever skin an animal alive.

howtoskinatiger:

caringblog:

Stop Skinning Animals Alive in China

Animals on fur farms in China are bludgeoned, slammed on the pavement and have their heads kicked in. Often, this doesn’t kill the poor animal so it remains alive for the skinning process. These living animals then have their skin ripped from their flesh while they hang by their limbs writhing in pain. Once the fur has been detached, the bodies are then thrown into piles where many animals continue to breath and squirm for up to ten minutes after being skinned alive. This brutal and torturous fur farming industry in China must be stopped.

Thankfully skinning alive is actually a myth created by animal rights groups. Those so-called undercover videos were actually staged and the people in them were paid by the group filming to skin animals alive, with the filmmakers testifying in court in 2009 that they paid for these acts to take place.

Skinning alive for fur doesn’t happen anywhere, not even China where the welfare of fur animals is poor at best. As someone who has skinned dead animals I can assure you it is not easy to do without damaging the pelt. Skinning an animal alive would guarantee that you will destroy the pelt through creating rips, tears and bloodstains, making the pelt worthless. Where is the logic in destroying your own product and putting yourself out of business? Skinning alive would also put the skinner at serious risk of injury. In short, there is no logical, ethical or financial reason to ever skin an animal alive.

(via thenixkat)

(via thenixkat)